OOO
t

19/05/2008


my photos

RAMSTER GARDENS

A beautiful mature woodland garden at Chiddingfold on the Surrey/West Sussex border.

I have visited two lovely gardens in the space of a week. The weather was warm and sunny for my visit to Highdown gardens, but on Friday when I visited Ramster gardens the temperature had definitely taken a plummet and it was cloudy, cold and damp. Today the sunshine is back, so with lifted spirits I am showing you my photos of yellow azaleas and rhododendrons, both acid loving plants.



In May the garden reaches its peak where the azaleas and rhododendrons provide a brilliant display, while the carpet of bluebells fill the air with their scent (although unfortunately these were over for our visit).



There are many rare trees and shrubs at Ramster and wonderful wild flower areas where in June bring orchids. There is a bog garden with giant gunnera leaves which I have featured in my post below.



The gardens at Ramster were laid out in the 1900s by Gauntlett Nurseries of Chiddingfold, who were pioneers in importing new shrubs, trees and ornaments from Japan. One hundred years on many of the original plants are still thriving in the garden today.



The house which is not open to the public is based on a Jacobean farmhouse, but the Long Hall is a popular venue for civil marriages, wedding receptions, dinners and corporate events.
Admission to the gardens is £5 but you can come and go as you please which we did having a picnic lunch in the middle of our visit, but if you have no picnic there is a tearooms. I resisted but there is also a plant sales area too!

12 comments:

Esther Montgomery said...

Hello

Wandered over from VP's Nettles.

How very beautiful your photos are.

How tempting that path is - to walk into the picture and along it . . .

Esther Montgomery
ESTHER IN THE GARDEN

Bumpkin Bears said...

wonderful, your photos transported me there, I love the house too, thanks for sharing.

Kari & Kijsa said...

Your photographs are WONDERFUL!

Thank you for sharing!

Have a blessed and wonderful day!

smiles, kari & kijsa

VP said...

Hi Louise,

Another lovely discovery to add to me ever growing list of must see gardens. Thansk for telling us all about it.

That yellow Rhododendron was in abumdance at Stourhead too. People didn't believe me when I told them what it was as they didn't think Rhodos were scented!
xx

VP said...

PS Caught the last half of Chelsea last night - it looks like it's going to be good 'un :)

Hubby is recording tonight's coverage as I shall be at choir - then it's catchup for the rest of the week!

Hope you enjoy it too!

Simone said...

You do get out and about Louise!!! The yellow plants are so vibrant and happy looking. Did you resist the plant sales area though?!!

bbaking said...

How gorgeous I'd love to visit here!

Have you ever been to the Hannah Peschar Garden in Surrey? http://www.hannahpescharsculpture.com/

I used to live next door in a big pink house called Leith Vale, we lived in the attic flat. The garden has lots of beautiful sculptures as well as lovely plants. I would love to know if you have/do visit.

Deb said...

Lovely blog and photos. Found you through Rhondi @ rosecoloredglasses.

Daisys Little Cottage said...

How wonderful to hve seen. i really like bog gardens though u dont see many. jack in the pulpits r my favorite of the boggers. thnks for sharing such a fabulous excursion.
smiles,
Darly

Gina said...

Glorious yellow rhododendron Louise! Rhodos and azaleas are 2 of my favourites...they do very well in our acidic soils..although I did manage to kill a rhodo once by pruning at the wrong time.. apparently you need to prune before flowers finish!
Well done on resisting the plant sales :O) Gx

Gillian L. said...

Great photos! I love the home. It looks like a wonderful place to visit.

Gillian

Lavinia Ladyslipper said...

Extraordinary hues of yellow; the first photo could be the cover of a greeting card. Or should I say "Should" be on the cover.

It's amazing how many blogs I come across that feature English gardens, and they all seem to be full of lovingly tended plants that have come from abroad; in many cases, from quite far away. Its a testament to the famous love of Botany by the Brits.